The INTERFACE Referral Service is aware of some service issues with our 888-244-6843 number. We are working to resolve this as quickly as possible. If you are having trouble reaching us at this number, please contact us at our local number, 617-332-3666, where our team will be happy to help you. We appreciate your patience.

We at the William James College INTERFACE Referral Service are keenly aware of the shortage of mental health providers of color and how racial inequities exist in medical and mental health care. The College’s Black Mental Health Academy, Center for Multicultural and Global Mental Health, and other programs and academic offerings are playing a critical role in reversing this trend. We invite you to read a statement from our Black Mental Health Graduate Academy Scholars, and to stand with us as allies to drive change and address systemic racism.

Baby Blues versus Postpartum Depression

Baby Blues versus Postpartum Depression

Looking for Support?

See our list of PPD support groups in Massachusetts. Please check with the listed organization for participant openings and registration details.

WHAT IS POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION?

Postpartum depression is a serious illness that can occur in the first few months after childbirth. It also can happen after  miscarriage and stillbirth.

Postpartum depression can make you feel very sad, hopeless, and worthless. You may have trouble caring for and bonding with your baby.

Postpartum depression is not the "baby blues," which usually go away within a couple of weeks. The symptoms of postpartum depression can last for months.

In rare cases, a woman may have a severe form of depression called  postpartum psychosis. This is an emergency, because it can quickly get worse and put her or others in danger.

It's very important to get treatment for depression. The sooner you get treated, the sooner you'll feel better and enjoy your baby.

 

WHAT IS BABY BLUES?

Postpartum blues, also called the "baby blues," during the first few days after childbirth. They may lose sleep, feel irritable, cry easily, and feel happy one minute and sad the next. Hormone changes are one cause of these emotional changes. Also, the demands of a new baby, coupled with visits from relatives or other family needs, add to a mother's stress. The "baby blues" usually peak around the fourth day and then ease up in less than 2 weeks.

 

Source: Network of Care Massachusetts

To learn more, visit these Network of Care Resources:

Postpartum Depression

postpartum psychosis

Baby Blues