Resource Organizations » Anger Management

In Massachusetts

Adults and Children Together Against Violence (ACT)

(800) 374-2721

(202) 336-5500

Nearly a half century of research has shown that violence is a learned behavior, often learned when a child is very young. But the skills of violence prevention can also be learned at a young age. ACT emphasizes that the early years are critical for learning and that the adults in children's lives can be the primary teachers of violence prevention. The ACT program mission is to educate communities and adults to create safe, healthy environments that protects children and youth from violence. It accomplishes its mission by disseminating research-based information and skills to adults in simple, accessible, user-friendly messages and materials.

BEST, Boston Emergency Services Team

Toll-free: 800-981-HELP

24 hours a day, seven days a week. By using this helpline, a caller is assisted in dealing with psychiatric crisis support, information, and referrals. The caller may be directed to a B.E.S.T. Urgent Care Center, a Designated Emergency Department, or a crisis intervention mobile team may be dispatched to the site of the crisis. The Urgent Care Center is located at the Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller Building, 85 E. Newton Street, Boston. It is open from 7am-11pm. It is strongly advised that prior to arrival to Urgent Care Center the Call Center be contacted at 1-800-981-4357.

EMERGE

617-547-9879

Fax: 617-547-0904

Email: info@emergedv.com

Emerge's mission is to eliminate violence in all interpersonal relationships. In working toward this goal, Emerge seeks to educate individual abusers, prevent young people from learning to accept violence in their relationships, improve institutional responses to domestic violence, and increase public awareness about the causes and solutions to relational violence.

Girls’ LEAP Self-Defense, Inc.

Phone: (617) 514-4285

Fax: (617)-514-4529

Email: leapmail@girlsLEAP.org

Girls' LEAP (Lifetime Empowerment & Awareness Program) trains at-risk girls aged 8-18 in verbal and physical safety skills and self-awareness. LEAP helps girls develop a diverse set of responses to violence, beyond the extremes of passivity and escalation. LEAP's physical skills techniques maximize girls' options and help girls to make safe decisions in spite of fear. The self-reflective skills strengthen girls' ability to say "no" in difficult situations, to create safe and constructive boundaries, and to identify and trust their own feelings.

Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC)

During the Academic Year: 508-531-1784

During Summers and Vacations: 508- 955-0272

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center is housed at Bridgewater State University in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. MARC was founded and is directed by Dr. Elizabeth Englander, a professor of Psychology at the University, and an expert in the field of bullying prevention. Its goal is to bring low- or no-cost services to K-12 education, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in the area of bullying prevention, cyberbullying education and prevention, and violence prevention. The MARC website includes guides for parents and professionals.

Riverside Emergency Services

800-529-5077

Twenty-four hour a day, 7 day a week on-site and mobile teams provide psychiatric and substance abuse assessment, emergency medication evaluation, information, referral, hospital prescreening and admission. The Emergency Services utilize a multi-disciplinary approach to intervention and treatment and collaborate closely with other community resources.

Outside Massachusetts

YFIRES: Youth Firesetting Information Repository & Evaluation System

503-805-8482

YFIRES is a data collection and national repository project developed by the International Association of Fire Fighters Charitable Foundation Burn Fund and funded through DHS/FEMA’s Grant Program Directorate for Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program - Fire Prevention and Safety Grants. The goal of this project is to create a centralized data collection tool that will assist youth firesetting intervention services in a number of disciplines (fire, mental health, law enforcement) and assemble a body of information that will enhance the national understanding of youth firesetting behavior and help in developing evidence-based intervention strategies.  

The International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) convened a group of youth firesetting intervention professionals in 2011 to discuss the problem of youth-set fires in the United States.  This group was unanimous in their opinion that fires set by youth were underreported across the United States and the need for a centralized database..  The IAFF committed to providing support and leadership to seek grant funding for a committee to further explore the national needs in this particular segment of the fire problem.  

The project convened meetings between subject matter experts in all disciplines related to youth firesetting intervention, both inside and outside the fire service.  Technical experts on data systems were an integral part of the process.  Through the combined effort, and over the course of four years of diligent work, YFIRES became the tool that is now available through this web site.