Use of Apps for Mental Health and Wellness

Many people experience barriers to receiving mental health treatment. Whether it is a busy schedule, transportation problems, or financial concerns, it can be difficult to maintain consistent appointments with a mental health provider. Below is a list of helpful mental health applications that can be used on your mobile device. Many of them are free for users, and the rest are purchasable for a small fee.  These applications help with a range of mental health needs – including maintaining daily balance and wellness, reducing stress, and reinforcing concepts related to treatment.   

  • Apps for Lowering Stress and Promoting Mindfulness and Wellness
    • Breathe2Relax
      • Created by the National Center for Telehealth and Technology, this app teaches users how to do diaphragmatic breathing. Its features include educational videos on the stress response, logs to record stress levels, and customizable guided breathing sessions. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • Stop, Breathe, Think!
      • This app can help cultivate mindfulness in 5 minutes. Mindfulness can improve mood, lower stress, and help increase self-compassion. In addition, this app can also help to improve focus by bringing one’s attention to the present moment, including thoughts and sensations, and encouraging a judgment-free outlook. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • eCBT calm
      • Implementing some of the many strategies of cognitive behavioral therapy, this app helps users assess their stress levels, practice mindfulness and relaxation skills, and connect their thoughts to feelings and behaviors. The end result is experiencing increased calmness in everyday life and more awareness of actions and emotions. This app can also be used to help manage symptoms of anxiety. ($0.99; iOS)
    • Happify
      • This app offers an array of engaging games and activity suggestions to promote gratitude and positive mood. It was designed with input from 18 psychologists.  The website also links to bonus “feel good” videos that are sure to make you smile. (Free trial, or $60 for the year):
    • Happier
      • Happier is an app that works to keep users optimistic by introducing them to a community of like-minded people, and giving them a place to journal thoughts and feelings. This app can also sync with the Apple Watch. (Free; iOS)
    • Optimism
      • Optimism is designed to help identify and work through users’ feelings as they arise, rather than when they are in the midst of trouble. According to the app makers, it helps users learn triggers so once can recognize early warning signs. It does this primarily through mood and trigger tracking, and also lets users create reports to share with a treatment team. (Free; iOS)
    • Super Better
      • SuperBetter can help increase resilience - the ability to stay strong, motivated and optimistic even in the face of difficult obstacles. Playing SuperBetter can encourage users to get through tough situations. The apps’ goal is to help people achieve the goals that matter most to them. Available in both mobile and online versions. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • Talkspace
      • Users can text message with a trained and licensed mental health professional every day of the week and as many times as they want. The app offers services for individuals and couples. It starts with a free, no-commitment assessment online that answers questions about the process and is for adults 18 and older.
      •  ($25/week; iOS and Android)

 

  • Apps for Specific Mental Health Concerns
    • ACT Coach
      • Good for: Anxiety, depression.
      • ACT Coach teaches users how to tolerate negative thoughts and feelings by virtually guiding them through awareness exercises and giving tips on how to ditch self-doubt. With an extra focus on mindfulness, this app also provides a log to track progress. (Free; iOS)
    • AETAS
      • Good for: Anxiety, OCD.
      • Chock-full of visual aids to encourage relaxation and self-soothing, AETAS also arms users with a time perspective inventory that helps them understand that how they view the past, present, and future will either help or hinder their happiness. ($4.99; iOS)
    • Bipolar Disorder Connect
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder.
      • Bipolar Disorder Connect can help connect people diagnosed with bipolar disorder to a community of people living with the condition. Users can ask and answer questions as well as make new friends. The app also features tracking tools to help monitor moods and share those updates. (Free; iOS)
    • Bipolar Disorder Guide
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder.
      • This app is for people recently diagnosed, and for their friends and family. The Bipolar Disorder Guide app has considerable educational value. Its main feature is an informational guide to this mood disorder, with chapters focused on treatment options, coping mechanisms, support group resources, and more. ($0.99; iOS)
    • BrainWave Tuner
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder, Depression, Insomnia, Chronic Pain.
      • This app offers a unique approach to managing mood. The BrainWave Tuner uses audible brainwave frequencies to help people manage their moods, pain, stress, and more. The app is based on similar technology as Electroencephalography, or EEG, which is routinely used in health care settings to measure neuronal activity in the brain. The app offers programs designed for meditation, destressing, focusing attention, and inducing sleep. There are also ambient sounds that can be played in the background, making it useful for general relaxation. ($3.99; iOS and Android)
    • DBSA Wellness Tracker
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder, Depression, Medication Management.
      • The DBSA Wellness Tracker comes from the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. Its user-friendly interface was designed to help users manage all aspects of their health. Users can track daily activity, moods, medications, and other symptoms. It’s a great tool to share with one’s doctor, providing a place to store all of your observations, triggers, and symptoms. (Free; iOS)
    • DBT Diary Card and Skills Coach
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder, Suicidality, Self-Injury, Emotion Regulation.
      • Dialectical behavior therapy, or DBT, is a type of therapy that is used to treat a variety of mental health disorders. This app uses the principles of DBT, with a skills coach and a behavior tracker that work in conjunction to help users slow down, analyze thoughts and feelings, and apply what has been learned for better moods and outcomes. ($4.99; iOS)
    • Depression CBT Self-Help Guide
      • Good for: Depression.
      • This app allows users to monitor dips in mood, learn about clinical depression and treatments, try guided relaxation techniques, and learn strategies to challenge negative thinking. (Free; Android)
    • How Are You
      • Good for: Depression, Anxiety, Suicidality.
      • The How Are You mood tracking app can help users identify situations that affect their mood the most. Users can log moods and the situations that influence them, view trends over time, and get tips for how to improve their mood on a daily basis. The app features a mood test that can analyze psychological well-being and a gratitude diary that provides a place to reflect on the positive things in life. ($12.99; iOS and Android)
    • iMoodJournal
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder, Depression, Insomnia, Medication Management.
      • Alerts remind users to check in and choose from a colorful scale of mood labels. There are also hashtags to help organize thoughts and triggers. Users can visualize hashtags on a chart to identify any correlations between how they feel and sleep patterns, medications, or other identifiers. The app can also link to Facebook for those who want to check in with friends and family. ($1.99; iOS and Android)
    • InFlow: Mood Diary
      • Good for: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety, and more.
      • In Flow is one option for tracking the effects of a mental health diagnosis, and the effectiveness of treatments. Users can share emotions with friends, and can learn to identify trends and triggers. (Free; Android)
    • MindShift
      • Good for: Anxiety, OCD, Pain.
      • This is a straightforward stress management tool that helps users re-think about what’s stressing them out through a variety of on-screen prompts. At the same time, the app encourages new ways to take charge of anxiety and tune into body signals. (Free; iOS and Andriod)
    • Moodlytics
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder, Depression.
      • With Moodlytics users can track their ups and downs with text, emoji’s, or photos. Users can also journal their feelings, set reminders, set mood goals, log moods from days passed, and create charts that break down just how often they’re feeling a certain way. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • Moodtrack Diary
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder, Depression.
      • The Moodtrack Diary app is designed to help users get a handle on mood swings, or at least learn how to better predict and manage them. There is a graphing feature that allows users to view moods over time and may help identify trends and cycles. (Free for Android; $0.99 for iOS)
    • T2 Mood Tracker
      • Good for: Bipolar Disorder, Depression, Anxiety, PTSD, and a Brain Injury.
      • The T2 Mood Tracker, created by the National Center for Telehealth and Technology, allows users to rate their moods by sliding a bar to the right or left, and add notes about medications and treatments. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • Operation Reach Out
      • Good for: Depression, Suicidality.
      • This mood tracker and resource locator was designed by Emory University researchers to aid in suicide prevention. Users create a personal profile that includes emergency contact information, current medications, safety plans, and reminders for appointments or medications. Plus, the app uses GPS to locate mental health care services nearby, should any user enter crisis mode. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • PTSD Coach
      • Good for: Anxiety (including PTSD), Trauma.
      • Available as an app or on the Web, PTSD Coach lets users select the specific issue they want to deal with (from anxiety and anger to insomnia and alienation), and then gives them guidance on how to lift their mood, shift their mindset, and reduce stress. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • Quit Pro
      • Good for: Substance abuse.
      • This app is a tracker for users’ smoking habits. Users can monitoring cravings over time, the places they puff the most, the triggers that lead them to light up, and the money saved by resisting a cigarette, this comprehensive app can help individuals develop better control over this habit. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • SAM
      • Good for: Anxiety, OCD.  
      • SAM’s approach is to monitor anxious thoughts, track behavior over time, and use guided self-help exercises to discourage stress. The app also offers a “Social Cloud” feature that allows users to confidentially share their progress with an online community for added support. (Free; iOSand Android)
    • Step Away
      • Good for: Substance abuse (drinking).
      • A study funded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism found that this pro-sobriety app helped reduce heavy drinking among users by 60 percent. Step Away offers tips on maintaining sobriety, encouragement, strategies to avoid drinking during stressful times, and a place to add drinking triggers. (Free; iOS)
    • Stop Drinking
      • Good for: Substance abuse (drinking).
      • Relying on the powers of relaxation, visualization, and positive suggestions, this pro-sobriety app has the goal of calming users’ mind and getting it to a less stressed place—where they’ll be less likely to crave a drink. There is a reminder feature that gives periodic chimes to prompt users to breathe and focus on the good throughout the day. ($2.99; iOS and Android)
    • Stress and Anxiety Companion
      • Good for: Anxiety, Depression, OCD.
      • This app can help make the process of releasing negative thoughts, practicing relaxation techniques, and engaging in mindful awareness a lot easier by guiding users through proven techniques to reduce those off-kilter thoughts and emotions while cultivating a much more present mindset. An additional feature allows users to identify anxiety triggers. ($4.99; iOS)
    • Virtual Hope Box
      • Good for: Depression, Suicidality.
      • The Virtual Hope Box (VHB) is designed as an add-on to psychotherapy. VHB provides individualized coping skills, relaxation skills, distraction techniques, and ways to create more positive thoughts. The app includes video, audio, images, inspirational quotes, coping strategies, mindfulness techniques, and more. (Free; iOS and Android)
    • Worry Watch
      • Good for: Anxiety, OCD.
      • The idea behind Worry Watch is to enable users to track what kick starts their anxiety, note trends in their feelings, observe when the outcomes were harmless, and keep tabs on insights to stop future rumination and anxiety. Worry Watch is password protected. ($1.99; iOS)

References:

K Schreiber (2015, April 13). 81 Awesome mental health resources when you can’t afford a therapist [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://greatist.com/grow/resources-when-you-can-not-afford-therapy

E Renter (2016, June 20). The best bipolar disorder apps of 2016 [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://www.healthline.com/health/bipolar-disorder/top-iphone-android-apps#2